I tweet drew the opening ceremonies of the Olympics in Sochi the other night, and will continue to for the next ten days. All the sketches are going to be collected on The New Yorker blog, the @SportingScene —some are already posted there!

schnellss asked: Hi Liza! I wanted to thank you for your contribution of "Funny Ladies"... I am working on a research project and I thought Barbara Shermund and her cartoons were so interesting, but I was amazed to find that there was almost no information on her online, despite her immense contribution to the cartoon world. Thankfully, since I attend the Ohio State University, your resources were available at the Billy Ireland Library of Cartoons! Your work has helped me incredibly. Cheers!

Thank you so much for writing me!  I am glad you are researching Shermund—I, too think she is extremely interesting.  Let me know when you have something to show, I would love to read it.  best,  Liza

oldloves:

Bill Murray on Gilda Radner:
"Gilda got married and went away. None of us saw her anymore. There was one good thing: Laraine had a party one night, a great party at her house. And I ended up being the disk jockey. She just had forty-fives, and not that many, so you really had to work the music end of it. There was a collection of like the funniest people in the world at this party. Somehow Sam Kinison sticks in my brain. The whole Monty Python group was there, most of us from the show, a lot of other funny people, and Gilda. Gilda showed up and she’d already had cancer and gone into remission and then had it again, I guess. Anyway she was slim. We hadn’t seen her in a long time. And she started doing, “I’ve got to go,” and she was just going to leave, and I was like, “Going to leave?” It felt like she was going to really leave forever.So we started carrying her around, in a way that we could only do with her. We carried her up and down the stairs, around the house, repeatedly, for a long time, until I was exhausted. Then Danny did it for a while. Then I did it again. We just kept carrying her; we did it in teams. We kept carrying her around, but like upside down, every which way—over your shoulder and under your arm, carrying her like luggage. And that went on for more than an hour—maybe an hour and a half—just carrying her around and saying, “She’s leaving! This could be it! Now come on, this could be the last time we see her. Gilda’s leaving, and remember that she was very sick—hello?”We worked all aspects of it, but it started with just, “She’s leaving, I don’t know if you’ve said good-bye to her.” And we said good-bye to the same people ten, twenty times, you know. And because these people were really funny, every person we’d drag her up to would just do like five minutes on her, with Gilda upside down in this sort of tortured position, which she absolutely loved. She was laughing so hard we could have lost her right then and there.It was just one of the best parties I’ve ever been to in my life. I’ll always remember it. It was the last time I saw her.”
- from Live from New York: an Uncensored History of Saturday Night Live

oldloves:

Bill Murray on Gilda Radner:

"Gilda got married and went away. None of us saw her anymore. There was one good thing: Laraine had a party one night, a great party at her house. And I ended up being the disk jockey. She just had forty-fives, and not that many, so you really had to work the music end of it. There was a collection of like the funniest people in the world at this party. Somehow Sam Kinison sticks in my brain. The whole Monty Python group was there, most of us from the show, a lot of other funny people, and Gilda. Gilda showed up and she’d already had cancer and gone into remission and then had it again, I guess. Anyway she was slim. We hadn’t seen her in a long time. And she started doing, “I’ve got to go,” and she was just going to leave, and I was like, “Going to leave?” It felt like she was going to really leave forever.

So we started carrying her around, in a way that we could only do with her. We carried her up and down the stairs, around the house, repeatedly, for a long time, until I was exhausted. Then Danny did it for a while. Then I did it again. We just kept carrying her; we did it in teams. We kept carrying her around, but like upside down, every which way—over your shoulder and under your arm, carrying her like luggage. And that went on for more than an hour—maybe an hour and a half—just carrying her around and saying, “She’s leaving! This could be it! Now come on, this could be the last time we see her. Gilda’s leaving, and remember that she was very sick—hello?”

We worked all aspects of it, but it started with just, “She’s leaving, I don’t know if you’ve said good-bye to her.” And we said good-bye to the same people ten, twenty times, you know. 

And because these people were really funny, every person we’d drag her up to would just do like five minutes on her, with Gilda upside down in this sort of tortured position, which she absolutely loved. She was laughing so hard we could have lost her right then and there.

It was just one of the best parties I’ve ever been to in my life. I’ll always remember it. It was the last time I saw her.”

- from Live from New York: an Uncensored History of Saturday Night Live

Who do you blame? From Women On Men, my new book!

Who do you blame? From Women On Men, my new book!

I have a new ebook of over 200 cartoons! Check it out: http://www.narrativemagazine.com/store/book/women-men #WomenOnMen

I have a new ebook of over 200 cartoons! Check it out: http://www.narrativemagazine.com/store/book/women-men #WomenOnMen

The Inconvenience of Patriarchy: Many lady layers of injustice

on The Nib

My latest contribution to Medium’s The Nib. Link below—lots of different editorial cartoonists and comic artists post fantastic work. Edited by Matt Bors. https://medium.com/the-nib/77e6e1816391

My latest contribution to Medium’s The Nib. Link below—lots of different editorial cartoonists and comic artists post fantastic work. Edited by Matt Bors. https://medium.com/the-nib/77e6e1816391